Phase one of Battor Catholic hospital project commissioned

The phase one of a project aimed at refurbishing the paediatric department of Battor Catholic Hospital in the North Tongu District of the Volta Region has been commissioned at cost of GH¢25,000.00.

This paved way for the launch of the phase two seeking to equip the department to manage neonatal cases effectively and expected to be handed over to the hospital latest by December, this year at a cost of GH¢1,599,775.

The phase one of the ‘Anmaci Battor Catholic Hospital’ project was characterised with the expansion of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) to effectively handle more neonatal cases for both within as well as referred cases.

Hitherto, the unit had worked with 14 baby cots with two incubators, but the phase one expanded the unit to take to accommodate 16 more baby cots.

Mr Martin Tandoh, the Chief Executive Officer of Anmaci events and the Chairman of the project noted that the phase two of the project launched prior to the commission sought to restructure the NICU and it would see drawing of child-friendly pictures on the walls at the children’s ward, create a Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) area and equip it, create and equip children play area as well as repainting of the paediatric department.

He said there were no incubators at the paediatric department until November, last year when Mr Samuel Okudjeto Ablakwa, the Member of Parliament for the area presented some medical equipment including two incubators.

He said, ‘Anmaci events’ as an events management firms, they deemed fit and organised parties for children on every June 15, thus his birthday for the past three years.

Mr Tandoh said the company went to organise a similar party for children in Battor Catholic hospital, when the need for the refurbishment was realised, leading to a subsequent launch of the first phase of the project.

Dr Bernard Hayford Atuguba, Medical Superintendent at the Hospital, launching the phase two said, prior to the completion of the phase one, the NICU had only two incubators with baby cots, which made it very challenging in handling neonatal intensive care cases.

He said a number of preterm babies delivered on monthly basis demanded a minimum of 10 incubators for effectiveness, adding that, “Monthly, we deliver about 15-20 preterm babies”.

Dr Atuguba indicated that due to the strategic positioning and the availability of one of the two paediatricians in the hospital, most of the ill-health of child birth from within and surrounding districts were referred to the hospital’s paediatric department and it was prudent to equip the hospital to make the NICU a complete and safe place for preterm babies.

He appealed to the public to support the phase two of the Anmaci Battor Catholic Hospital project since it was the most critical part of the entire refurbishment of the children’s ward.

Dr Anthoinette Ekuban, the Paediatrician and the Head of the Paediatric department said the hospital had resorted to improvising by keeping preterm babies without incubators in a wrapped blanket or placed under onion bulbs to create the needed warmth for their survival.

She said they were eagerly waiting for the phase to be completed as it would provide them with two more incubators, 20 more baby cots, radiant warmers, 10 monitors, six phototherapy units and many other equipment.

Dr Ekuban said that there were usually five monthly preterm mortality, adding however that not all were associated with coldness although it contributed highly to the numbers adding that some preterm babies died as a result of inadequate incubators among other factors.

She commended the Anmaci team, who were joined by the June borns of Christ the King Catholic Church for the kind gesture, saying it would go a long way to assist health delivery in the facility.

The day’s event was also characterised with the birthday celebration of Mr Tandoh, which culminated into a party for the children and mothers present at the hospital.

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