It’s A Family Affair In Ghana Boxing - Unique Stories Of Father-And-Son Teamwork

Paul Dogboe’s deep faith, sacrifice and hard work in guiding his son, Isaac ‘Royal Storm’ Dogboe, to become Ghana’s newest world boxing champion, has thrown the spotlight on the unique and successful father-son relationships in Ghana boxing.

Last month Isaac scored an 11th round TKO victory over Mexican-American, Jessie Magdaleno, to win the World Boxing Organisation super bantamweight title at the Liacouras Centre in Philadelphia to become Ghana’s ninth world boxing champion -- and the youngest -- at 23.

Early in the year, Isaac defeated Mexican Cesar Juarez via a fifth round TKO to win the WBO Interim super bantamweight title and laid down a marker before his giant-killing feat against Magdaleno on April 28.

Behind the WBO champion’s success story is a solid foundation laid by his father and trainer, Paul, who honed his son’s talent and oversaw his meteoric rise to fame.

However, Ghana boxing is replete with similar stories of boxers following in the path of their famous fathers into the ring. It is worth mentioning that before the father-son relationship of the Dogboes, there already existed a strong family tradition of fathers training their sons in boxing.

Among the most notable stories is that of legendary trainer, Attuquaye Clottey, a man credited for discovering Azumah Nelson, as a teenager.

Attuquaye trained his sons, Joshua Clottey, Judas Clottey and Emmanuel Clottey who all became professional boxers and made Ghana proud at some point in their careers.

Joshua was the most successful member of the Clottey family of boxers as a former IBF welterweight champion
There is also the famous Hammond family, which produced Ghana’s only medallist at the recent Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast, Australia.

Jessie Lartey, who won bronze at the Commonwealth Games is the grandson of Jones Hammond, a former boxer, who also trained his son, Lartekwei ‘Shocker’ Hammond , to win 21 fights out of 31 bouts as a super middleweight fighter in Ghana.

It is significant to note also that Lartekwei, the head coach of the national amateur team (Black Bombers), once trained his son, Jessie, during the early days of his amateur career.






Boxing legend Azumah Nelson, the most accomplished Ghanaian boxer, is also training his son, Azumah Nelson Jnr, towards greatness.

Azumah told the media recently that he believed his son was destined to be a world champion in future.

The legend even predicted that his son would become more accomplished than him as a boxer.

That may be overambitious from the legend, but perhaps an exactitude from one of the sport’s finest practitioners, Nelson Jnr, last fought nine months ago when he defeated Prosper Dzidzor in the Azumah Nelson Fight Nights series at the Bukom Boxing Arena in Accra.

The youngster has showed potential and it is yet to be seen if he can step into the big shoes of his father, the only African in the exclusive International Boxing Hall of Fame.

Without a doubt, the Dogboes are in the spotlight currently because of their recent accomplishments.

Paul, a former member of the British army and a fitness expert, had a short career as an amateur boxer.

His little experience in the ring provided him with useful insights and experience to transform him into a great boxing coach to guide his son into a world champion.

Lartekwei and Jessie Lartey also provide another interesting father-and-son story.

Coach Quaye, as Lartekwei is popularly called, always dreamt of mentoring someone to become a world champion in future.

When Jessie was born 24 years ago, it was a fine opportunity for his son to continue with his legacy.

As coach he honed the talents of Jessie at an early age until he joined the national team,culminating in his success at the Commonwealth Games.

The telepathic father-and-son relationship between the Hammonds whenever they train at the Attoh Quarshie Gym at Swalaba and at the D.G. Hathiramani Sports Hall makes an interesting partnership.

Lartekwei once told the Graphic Sports that he did not want to pamper Jessie, nor did he want to make him feel swollen-headed or feel pampered during training because he wants his son to achieve what he (father) could not achieve.

With a Commonwealth bronze medal under his belt, Jessie is a chip of an old block who can only work hard in order to live his father’s dreams.

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